Sally Ride Defied Gravity

Video of the journey that turned a physicist into a trailblazer

Sally Ride died today after a 17-month battle with pancreatic cancer. She was 61.

Ride will best be remembered for being the first American woman in space: Nearly 30 years ago, on June 18, 1983, Ride joined the crew of the Space Shuttle Challenger for its seventh mission, STS-7. She was 32 at the time, which meant that she was doubly a trailblazer: Ride was also the youngest American to make the journey.

It's right that Ride be remembered for the history she made that day and in the days that followed. But it's not enough. Ride, who earned her Ph.D. in physics -- from Stanford, no less -- was not just an astronaut, an explorer, and a pioneer; she was also, variously: a professor, an author, an athlete, an entrepreneur, a detective, a strategist, an expert in international security, a partner, a daughter, an aunt, an advocate for science education, an advocate for astronaut safety, an inspirer of girls, an inspirer of boys, and -- perhaps the greatest honor America can bestow upon its heroes -- a namer of schools. She was a role model in the best possible way: She lived a life of empathic adventure. She inspired people here on earth -- scientists, teachers, kids who gaze at the sky -- to put their own spin on that cosmic line: 'Ride, Sally Ride ...' 

Presented by

Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus