London 1984: Olympics Organizers Say You Can Only Link to Them If You're Not Mean

Everyone has heard by now that Olympics organizers are control freaks, but this is really a stunning bit of craziness that militates against the entire spirit of the Internet. In the official "Terms of Use" for the London 2012 website, the free speech blog found a "linking policy" that contains the following edict (emphasis added):

a. Links to the Site. You may create your own link to the Site, provided that your link is in a text-only format. You may not use any link to the Site as a method of creating an unauthorised association between an organisation, business, goods or services and London 2012, and agree that no such link shall portray us or any other official London 2012 organisations (or our or their activities, products or services) in a false, misleading, derogatory or otherwise objectionable manner.

Wow! This is not only unenforceable, but likely to provoke derogatory AND otherwise objectionable linking from the good people of cyberspace. Allow me to get things started: Attempting to control how people link to your site is very, very stupid.

Via @trevortimm

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