Earth from the Space: The Chunking Petermann Glacier

petermann615.jpg

NASA

Along the northwest coasts of Greenland, a massive glacier sits, called the Petermann Glacier. Chunks of it occasionally break off and become floating islands of ice. This last happened in 2010 -- making national and international news -- and it happened again last week. Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data, remarked to Michon Scott, a NASA writer, that this breaking apart (called a calving) happened "farther back [on the glacier] than historical calving fronts."

These pictures were taken by NASA's Aqua satellite, which passes multiple times in a day over the poles and near-poles. Therefore, Scott can construct a brief tick-tock of the glacier's breaking on the Agency's Flickr page. It's worth a read.

Below, recent Pictures of the Day:


Presented by

Robinson Meyer is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he covers technology.

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well. Bestselling author Mark Bittman teaches James Hamblin the recipe that everyone is Googling.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Technology

Just In