Earth from the Space: The Chunking Petermann Glacier

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NASA

Along the northwest coasts of Greenland, a massive glacier sits, called the Petermann Glacier. Chunks of it occasionally break off and become floating islands of ice. This last happened in 2010 -- making national and international news -- and it happened again last week. Ted Scambos, lead scientist at the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data, remarked to Michon Scott, a NASA writer, that this breaking apart (called a calving) happened "farther back [on the glacier] than historical calving fronts."

These pictures were taken by NASA's Aqua satellite, which passes multiple times in a day over the poles and near-poles. Therefore, Scott can construct a brief tick-tock of the glacier's breaking on the Agency's Flickr page. It's worth a read.

Below, recent Pictures of the Day:


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Robinson Meyer is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he covers technology.

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