Why an English Teacher Introduced Her Class to the World

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When high school students submit papers to the Web rather than their instructor does the larger audience inspire them to write more seriously?

Meet Ileana Jimenez.

Notes from the Aspen Ideas Festival -- See full coverage


She's an English teacher in a progressive New York City high school, a blogger, and a gracious interview subject. I encountered her at the Aspen Ideas Festival, where she agreed to explain why she wants her students to write publicly on the Internet, rather than merely turning in assignments for a lone teacher to evaluate:

Good idea, right?

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Conor Friedersdorf is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he focuses on politics and national affairs. He lives in Venice, California, and is the founding editor of The Best of Journalism, a newsletter devoted to exceptional nonfiction.

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