We're Really Sorry, Marie Curie

There's only one word for the European Commission's attempt to attract women to careers in science: sorry.

From: Women, everywhere
Subject: "Science: It's a Girl Thing!"
Date: June 27, 2012 11:15 AM EDT
To: Marie Curie, Ada Lovelace, Florence Nightingale, Rosalind Franklin, Jane Goodall, and millions more ...
Cc: European Commission

Dear Dr. Curie et al, 

On behalf of women, the world, progress, and the year 2012, we would like to apologize for the European Commission's above effort to encourage women to pursue careers in science. Though we were not responsible for the making of the film, we nonetheless feel compelled to express our regret -- to you and your legacies -- for its creation and continued existence. The advertisement may well have been well-intentioned, and we certainly have no objection to heels or lipstick or sunglasses or muzak or giggles or the synthetic charms of Pepto Bismol Pink. 

We believe, however, that science sells itself. It needs no polish or varnish or manufactured appeal to be attractive to women. To imply otherwise is an insult. To science and to women.

Please accept our sincerest apologies. 

Yours,
Women, everywhere

Presented by

Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic. She was formerly an assistant editor at the Nieman Journalism Lab, where she wrote about innovations in the media.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Technology

Just In