Is There an Instaexodus or Is All the Facebook-Acquisition Bellyaching Just Talk?

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Instaport is a service that allows Instagram users to backup and/or export the photos they have saved on Instagram. The service, creator Florian Brandel told me, normally sees about 400 unique users a day.

In the past six hours, 25,000 people have visited Instaport.

Which: yeah. You could read that spike, on the one hand, as a mass freak-out on the part of users who don't trust Facebook -- despite Mark Zuckerberg's promises -- with their networks and memories.

You could also read it as an insurance play, a just-to-be-safe move on the part of people who want to feel sure that their photos are secure. And the spike accounts for that, too.

But it's also worth remembering that Instagram, at least count, has 25 million users. And that only 0.1% of those users have availed themselves, so far, of Instaport's services. Despite the new uncertainty about Instagram's future, it's only a tiny, tiny minority of users who have so far jumped ship (or, you know, inflated a life raft). So today's acquisition news may have brought on an Instapanic ... but not an Instaexodus.

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Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic.

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