Hope You Like 3D! Because Now It's Available to All Users of YouTube

Parahawking is an activity that combines paragliding with falconry. It involves, per one of the more delightful Wikipedia entries out there, birds of prey being "trained to fly with paragliders, guiding them to thermals for in-flight rewards and performing aerobatic maneuvers."

Parahawking, in other words, is wondrous, and hilarious, and a testament to all the wonder and hilarity that may be achieved when human beings, helmeted and harnessed and guided by feathered friends, take to the skies. 

But just in case you need proof of parahawking's obvious attributes, here is a video of the activity in action, tracking teams of human-hawks as they glide over the mountainous terrain of Nepal:

Again: awesome. But, then, this is not (sorry!) a post about parahawking; it is a post about the YouTube video above, the one that allows you to witness the wacky world of avian aeronautics in its just-slightly-shaky glory -- and the one that, should you have a pair of 3D glasses nearby, you could watch in all three dimensions.

This type of 3D-ready video will likely become more and more common -- at least on YouTube. Expanding on last year's beta test of 3D capability, the service is now launching 3D conversion options that will be available to all users. Starting today, anyone who uploads a short-form video in 1080p (high definition) to YouTube will have the option, through clicking some buttons in the video settings field, of rendering that video in 3D.

Which is both fantastic (some kind of future, it is here!), and also something of a turning point for 3D video. It's one thing for James Cameron to make movies in three dimensions; it's quite another for you, random video-uploader, to make them, as well. There's a leveling element to today's rollout: The most cutting-edge technology in Hollywood is now available to anyone -- to everyone -- for free. So that should when you take up parahawking ... you, too, can record your adventures with the 3D fidelity they deserve.

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Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic. She was formerly an assistant editor at the Nieman Journalism Lab, where she wrote about innovations in the media.

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