When Americans Made Toys by Hand: Inside a 1915 Teddy Bear Factory

More

If there is one thing I enjoy about the web, it's the way that primary historical materials are as close to hand as a Gawker blog post or a Amazon.com. Getting your hands on real, printed photographs from the 1910s takes work, even if you happen to have a university affiliation.

Online, as part of our daily labor here on The Atlantic, I often find myself at the Library of Congress searching through hundreds of thousands of photographs of all kinds of things. At a time when algorithms are supposed to be reducing serendipity to the opposite of a chance encounter, I find the blunt search tools at the LOC constantly spit out wonderfully unexpected things.

For Alexander Furnas' story yesterday about power, privacy, and data tracking, I wanted to find a photograph of a bunch of dolls, so I searched for "doll shop." Scrolling down the list, I didn't find what I wanted, but one title for a group of photos caught my eye: "Old men making toys in a shop maintained for their benefit, apparently by society women." The record told me George Grantham Bain made these pictures in 1915. The extended description read, "Photographs show men cutting animals and dolls from wood. Women purchasing Christmas gifts. Also, teddy bear factory." There is no more information attached to the record, but who really needs more than TEDDY BEAR FACTORY, really.

Take a look at these photographs. They tell you something about how and where toys were once made. But they also tell you something mustaches and hairstyles, about the way people tucked in their blouses, and what a teddy bear looked like in 1915. You can see how many humans worked in a teddy bear factory and how they held themselves when someone walked onto the floor with a camera.

What I'm trying to point out is this: Algorithms may take the brownian motion out of discovering stuff, but it's not as if adjacency goes away. Serendipity, for me, is nothing more than an openness to seeing.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Alexis C. Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Technology Channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. More

The New York Observer calls Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti.

He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press).

Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Sad Desk Lunch: Is This How You Want to Die?

How to avoid working through lunch, and diseases related to social isolation.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where Time Comes From

The clocks that coordinate your cellphone, GPS, and more

Video

Computer Vision Syndrome and You

Save your eyes. Take breaks.

Video

What Happens in 60 Seconds

Quantifying human activity around the world

Writers

Up
Down

More in Technology

Just In