Users Still Turn to Traditional Sites for News

While new media evangelists like to say social media has takeover of the news, Pew's State of the News Media report shows that the revolution is still far from overthrowing the old regime.

This year's State of the News Media report from the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism hit the Web early Monday and provides new details about the rate at which Twitter and Facebook are becoming readers' primary sources of news.

The shift is happening, the data says, but the vast majority of people still "very often" use the traditional avenues like search and going directly to a news site to find their news. Only "9 percent of Americans very often follow news recommendations from Facebook or from Twitter on any of the three digital devices," Pew reports.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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