Is There a Fatal Flaw in the TSA Nude-Body Scanners?

A lone blogger seems to have discovered a fatal flaw in the TSA's whole-body imaging scanners (the ones that take pictures of you naked while you stand in a machine posing like a victim of an armed robbery). Watch this video and see for yourself. I'm waiting for a TSA explanation, which I hope is a good one. In the meantime, I would remind Goldblog readers that, a few years ago, I discovered an easy way to bring long knives onto airplanes, by reconstructing a roller bag so that lengths of its metal frame could detach while in flight and form 18-inch swords. Also, I reported on a method to bring box-cutters and knives through security by simply taping them to the metal components of carry-on bags.

But, whatever, right?


Update: Here is the TSA's response to this video:

The video is a crude attempt to allegedly show how to circumvent TSA screening procedures. For obvious security reasons, we can't discuss our technology's detection capability in detail, however TSA conducts extensive testing of all screening technologies in the laboratory and at airports prior to rolling them out the field. Imaging technology has caught many items large and small, and is one of the most effective tools available to detect metallic and non-metallic items, such as the greatest threat to aviation, explosives.

TSA deploys a layered, risk-based approach to security through screening technologies and applying intelligence to our security measures in real time. Our nations' aviation system is safer now with the deployment of 600 imaging technology units at 140 airports. It is completely safe and the vast majority use a generic image that completely addresses privacy concerns. 
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Jeffrey Goldberg is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and a recipient of the National Magazine Award for Reporting. He is the author of Prisoners: A Story of Friendship and Terror. More

Before joining The Atlantic in 2007, Goldberg was a Middle East correspondent, and the Washington correspondent, for The New Yorker. He was previouslly a correspondent for The New York Times Magazine and New York magazine. He has also written for the Jewish Daily Forward and was a columnist for The Jerusalem Post.

Goldberg's book Prisoners was hailed as one of the best books of 2006 by the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, The Progressive, Washingtonian magazine, and Playboy. He received the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and the 2005 Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize. He is also the winner of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists prize for best international investigative journalist; the Overseas Press Club award for best human-rights reporting; and the Abraham Cahan Prize in Journalism.

In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation, and in 2002 he became a public-policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C.

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