As Google Wave Sunsets, Remembering Its Only Good Use Case

Yesterday, Google sent out a reminder to its Google Wave users that the company's ill-fated foray into social networking will leave the web forever next month. Not much came of the much-ballyhooed service, despite Google's insistence that it "ha[d] the potential for making you more productive when communicating and collaborating. Even when you're just having fun!"

However, one amazing web artifact was created with Google Wave, a rendition of a famous scene from Pulp Fiction using the tools embedded in the service. I've embedded it below, but I have to warn you: this is Tarantino's Pulp Fiction we're talking about here, so the language is strong and it ends in a shooting. So, you know, don't click play if you don't know what you're getting into. (There's always Good Wave Hunting for you.)

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