Until Yesterday, Kickstarter Had No $1 Million Projects—Today, It Has 2

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It's been a huge day for the crowdfunding platform, Kickstarter, which saw its two most-backed projects reach $1 million in pledges within four hours of each other yesterday.

The first project to reach the one-million-dollar threshhold was the Elevation Dock, an iPhone dock, which got its million from more than 9,000 backers. It hit the number at about 2pm West Coast time.

Meanwhile, a fascinating-looking game from Tim Schafer and 2 Player Productions called Double Fine Adventures was on a tear. It had raised its $400,000 goal in its first eight hours. The explosion of interest kept many at Kickstarter and 2 Player up all night watching the money pour in from fans. By 6pm yesterday, the Double Fine Adventure project had received $1 million in pledges from more than 25,000 people.

Both the million-dollar projects offer a version of the "pre-purchase." That is to say, you don't just get cool "rewards" like stickers when you back the project, you get the product itself.

It was all part of a red-letter day for Kickstarter. On Thursday, Kickstarter's members pledged $1,605,981, more than doubling the previous record of $736,730, which had been set ... on Wednesday.

The Kickstarter team was very happy and possibly collectively inebriated:

kickstarterNY.jpg


For me, the key context for Kickstarter's success is this: If Kickstarter merely funds things that would have gotten money in some other way, it's a cool thing. But, if Kickstarter funding allows the creation of fundamentally new and different kinds of stuff, then it is a creative engine of a much-higher caliber. 



Via Rob Dubbin.

Images: Kickstarter.

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Alexis C. Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Technology Channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. More

The New York Observer calls Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti.

He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press).

Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.

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