Meet the Pringles of Personal Hygiene

infinite.jpeg

There is a scourge among us, and it lives in the shower.

The Soap Sliver: that strip, composed of sodium stearate and evil, that sticks, insistently, to all surfaces that aren't your hands. Though the wretched thing, denuded and desiccated, technically -- technically -- is a bar of soap ... soap, in any practical sense, it is not.

But: soapocalypse prevented! Maybe! New on Kickstarter is a pitch for Stack, the soap that ... well, you get it. It's the genius Pringles design, applied to shower time. Each bar of Stack has a Soap Sliver-shaped groove at the top, allowing shower-ers (and, hey, bath-takers and hand-washers and what have you) to combine each sliver with the new bar. After a few uses, the idea goes, the old and the new will merge together into one glorious, soap-saving unit.

"I call this the 'infinite cycle of soap,'" Aric Norine, Stack's inventor, says. He explains:

In 2007 I married a germaphobe -- a frugal germaphobe who uses 3x the soap of a normal person and refuses to waste anything. It seemed almost every time I grabbed the soap, it had been worn down to a sliver by my lovely wife. Seeing this as a challenge, I set out to create a bar soap that could integrate pieces together. Stack soap is my way to eliminate the soap sliver ... and save my marriage.

Here's Stack in action:

This is genius for several reasons, the most obvious of which is Stack's implied demise of the Soap Sliver. But, from a tech perspective, the Pringley design is a nice reminder of how utterly simple a new technology can be. Norine is pitching, in his product, not just "spa quality skin care" and "an all-vegetable base infused with jojoba oil to moisturize and protect sensitive skin"; he's also, and ultimately, pitching a design innovation. He's pitching a groove. A groove that's a force for good.


Image: Kickstarter.

Presented by

Megan Garber is a staff writer at The Atlantic.

Saving the Bees

Honeybees contribute more than $15 billion to the U.S. economy. A short documentary considers how desperate beekeepers are trying to keep their hives alive.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Cook Spaghetti Squash (and Why)

Cooking for yourself is one of the surest ways to eat well.

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Technology

Just In