While Wikipedia's Down, This Tool Will Answer Your Questions With Google's Cache

For all you high school students who have papers due tomorrow, as well as anyone else who might like to access Wikipedia while the site is offline to protest SOPA, we have a clever workaround for you.  Atlantic friend and contributor Philip Bump created a simple site -- http://pbump.net/wiki/ -- that lets you search Google's cache of Wikipedia to find recent copies of articles. Obviously, the cached versions of the millions of Wikipedia articles won't retain their full functionality, but as a temporary Wikipedia replacement, it's pretty slick.

The site also a great reminder that the Internet is very good at defeating attempts to restrict information flow by anyone, even those people protesting to keep the flow unfettered.

(As several people have pointed out to me on Twitter, you can also access Wikipedia by turning off Javascript in your browser or going to the mobile site. Just FYI.)

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