Video of the Day: With 12 Atoms, the World's Smallest Storage Bit

Researchers at IBM have been able to store magnetic information with only 12 atoms, dramatically increasing the potential storage capacity of devices down the road. Using a scanning tunneling microscope, they can magnetically align the atoms in one direction or the other to indicate 0 or 1. With eight of these 12-atom bits, they have a byte, which can store alphabetical and numerical characters. The new technology is 100 times more information dense that current hard disk technology. The video above explains how it works.

Below, recent Pictures of the Day:

Image: IBM.

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Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

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