How to Work for NASA (in Your Free Time)

Today, NASA launched a new site to introduce programmers to open-source projects on which they can work with the space agency.

Code.NASA.gov contains four open projects now, but the site remains in alpha and many more opportunities to code for space are planned. The effort looks to be spearheaded by NASA's Ames Research Center, which is located in Silicon Valley.

In his introductory note, Ames researcher William Eshagh laid out the plans for the site. "Ultimately, our goal is to create a highly visible community hub that will imbue open concepts into the formulation stages of new hardware and software projects, and help existing projects transition to open modes of development and operation," Eshagh wrote.

It may be a far cry from astronautdom, but hey, it beats watching reruns of Star Trek: TNG. And you don't have to climb into one of these centrifuges even once.

amescentrifuge_big.jpg

Via @geetadayal


Presented by

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Technology

Just In