What Will Remain: The Booksellers Who Will Survive Amazon

This year has been one of tumult for the book industry. The proliferation of e-readers, such as Kindles and Nooks, has rearranged the landscape: bestseller lists now regularly include self-published titles, and the nation's second-largest bookstore chain -- Borders -- has closed up shop. For many in the industry -- both on the publishing and retail sides -- the changes posed by e-readers are pushing them to revisit their business strategies, rolling out print-on-demand machines to lure customers inside, or offering discounts for people who pledge to boycott Amazon's new Price Checker app. Especially for those who sell new books, the future is uncertain as they try to compete with e-books. The broader societal worry is that bookstores might have been more than a place to purchase books, but rather an important node in the physical social network of intellectual life. We may get books cheaper, but we lose a gathering place for people who like to read.

Still, the book industry is diverse, and e-books won't be as disruptive for those who sell used books or booksellers in places where e-readers are not as widely used. Below, a look at some bookshops around the world that will survive the age of Amazon.

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Rebecca J. Rosen is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where she oversees the Business Channel. She was previously an associate editor at The Wilson Quarterly.

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