Amazon Is Slow to Fix Its Kindle Fire Problems

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After months of Kindle Fire complaints , Amazon has finally promised a fix, coming in two weeks -- over a month and a half since the device first came out -- the company told  The New York Times's David Streitfeld. The fix doesn't address some of the most common complaints, but it is the first admission the company has made to the device having some problems. Even so, Amazon says the device has sold well and ratings haven't tanked.

Since the Kindle Fire came out in mid-November, users have  had trouble connecting to WiFi, have reported slow browsing, have complained of privacy issues, and have lamented the volume and on and off switches. The current update will contain "improvements in performance and multitouch navigation, and customers will have the option of editing the list of items that show what they have recently been doing," writes Steitfeld. Presumably the "improvements in performance" will address some of that speed stuff, but nowhere in there does it guarantee a Web browsing fix and there's no mention of WiFi -- kind of a big problem for a tablet that has no 3G capabilities and just relies on WiFi to get users connected.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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