Weird! Start-Up Company Will Wash Your Car Wherever It's Parked

mullins.jpg

Startups do all kinds of things. Some of them sell weapons to the military. Others work on solar power. And yet another, Cherry, which launched yesterday, will send someone to wash your car, no matter where it is. (At least if you live in San Francisco, the service's first market.)

Here's the idea. First, you sign up for the service and put a credit card on file. Then, any time you want your car washed, you check in online with the car's location, and someone arrives to wash it there. $29 gets charged on your credit card and that's it. I spotted the service when Shasta Ventures' Jacob Mullins tweeted he was getting his car done. That's the photo up there that he posted.

While I think Cherry is interesting as it is, when I first saw Mullins tweet, I thought it was a much more wide-ranging service. "Ask and you shall receive. will arrive at my office to wash my car in 33 mins. Amazing," Mullins wrote. So, naturally, I thought Cherry was some kind of real-world errand running service. You tweet what you need done and someone does it. How awesome would that be? Like Mechanical Turk for the real world!

UPDATE: Oh, wait! Such a startup exists. It's called TaskRabbit: "Get just about anything done by safe, reliable, awesome people." Stay tuned for more on them.

Image: Jacob Mullins, @jacob.

Could this sort of errand service spread to other parts of our lives? If so -- awesome!

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