The Sharebros Are Building a Google Reader Replacement

One code-savvy, soon-to-be-former Google Reader user would rather create a new site for the RSS-feeds than switch to Google+. Last Friday, Google announced that it was getting rid of Reader's social features -- the ability to follow other people, to share content within Reader and so forth -- in order to encourage more people to use Google+ for those kinds of activities within a week. The backlash online was immediate and visceral, and a small group of protesters even picketed outside the company's DC offices, calling for an Occupy Google Reader movement. We tried contacting Google a number of times over the past week about how they were responding to the complaints and when the changes would go into place but never received a reply.

Hearing radio silence from Google, self-identified Google Reader fanatic (also known as a Sharebro) Ryan Cleary decided to take things into his own hands. Cleary tried using Google+ a bit but says it didn't feel right. So over the past ten days, Cleary has been devoting every minute of his free time to building his own social RSS site that will keep Reader's dying features alive. For now, he's calling it HiveMined.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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