Occupy Wall Street Is Building Its Own Social Network

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If the Occupy Wall Street movement is "America's first true Internet-era movement," as CNN's Douglas Rushkoff contended in a blog post last week, it's actual Internet presence leaves a lot to be desired. He called the protest "a way of life that spreads through contagion [and] creates as many questions as it answers." And instead of identifying its enemy and fighting, "Occupy Wall Street just sits there talking with itself, debating its own worth, recognizing its internal inconsistencies and then continuing on as if this were some sort of new normal." So, to try to apply some of the Internet's ability to get groups talking, Occupy Wall Street is getting its own social network. Due to launch on Thursday night, the goal of the homegrown Facebook analog is to give the movement's disparate members, organizers, and working groups a central place to communicate online. Its developers hope the site will work as a microcosm of the community that's sprung up in Zuccotti Park, which they see in turn as a microcosm for the kind of society they want to create.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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