A Social Network That Wants to Know Exactly Where You Live

More

For as long as the internet has been around, companies have been trying (and failing) to get people to behave online, but a new social networking site called Nextdoor isn't discouraged. Lately, a new trend is emerging in hyperlocal social networks quite literally aimed at helping you get to know your neighbors better, and Nextdoor thinks therein lies the solution to keep people kind: Make them show their faces. Nextdoor launches publicly on Wednesday, and it takes the real-name approach to social networking, championed most recently (and unsuccessfully) by Google+, to a new level. Your account is attached not only to your actual identify but also your physical address. This sounds dangerous.

At a glance, Nextdoor sounds like an awesome idea as it's geared towards providing a public service. The site allows people within a certain geographical area to set up private social networking sites that enable you to connect with people that live nearby, set up events and post status updates that your neighbors can comment on. There are also a number of tools that make hyperlocal chores like selling your mountain bike or finding a good lawn guy easier. Imagine a site that fuses together the concepts behind Craigslist, Angie's List and Facebook all at once. However, unlike those first two services, you must use your real identity and also verify your address using one of four methods. You can type in a verification code either from a card mailed to your house or revealed in a phone call to a landline at that address. You can also verify your address through your credit card billing address or from a recommendation by an already verified neighbor. To protect privacy, Nextdoor sites are not indexed by Google.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

Jump to comments
Presented by

The Atlantic Wire is your authoritative guide to the news and ideas that matter most right now.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Why Are Americans So Bad at Saving Money?

The US is particularly miserable at putting aside money for the future. Should we blame our paychecks or our psychology?


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

The Death of Film

You'll never hear the whirring sound of a projector again.

Video

How to Hunt With Poison Darts

A Borneo hunter explains one of his tribe's oldest customs: the art of the blowpipe

Video

A Delightful, Pixar-Inspired Cartoon

An action figure and his reluctant sidekick trek across a kitchen in search of treasure.

Video

I Am an Undocumented Immigrant

"I look like a typical young American."

Video

Why Did I Study Physics?

Using hand-drawn cartoons to explain an academic passion

Writers

Up
Down

More in Technology

Just In