Where Ideas Come From: Inside Wistia's Headquarters

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This is part of an occasional photo feature that takes you inside the headquarters of today's top tech companies, from the big multinationals to the young startups of Silicon Valley. If you'd like to participate, or have a company to suggest, email me at njackson[at]theatlantic[dot]com.

A year after graduating from Brown University with a degree in filmmaking, Chris Savage started Wistia, a 10-person startup based in Somerville, Massachusetts, with the goal of building the best online video management system for businesses. That was about five years ago, and the company has experienced much success since. Over the last six months, the headcount at Wistia has doubled, a sign that Savage is at least on track to reach his goal.

So what's the secret to Savage's success? In part, he believes, it's the community he's built. Not just the staff he has surrounded himself with, but the physical space they occupy. "I believe that creating an engaging environment and company culture are absolutely critical to long-term success," Savage told The Atlantic over email. And it shows. Here, some images Savage shot for us from inside Wistia's headquarters:

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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