The First Signs of Mutiny in the Android Brigade

Despite the billowing success of the iPhone, recent studies show that Android is the number one mobile platform in the world. For companies that depend on it, the Google-powered Android operating system for mobile phones and tablets is free, and given Google's increasingly large war chest of intellectual property, it also serves a shield against stray bullets in the software patent wars. For some reason, the top officers in the Android army are showing signs of defecting. HTC chair Cher Wang told a Chinese newspaper that the Taiwanese company is thinking about buying an operating system, one that would presumably replace the Android software that currently powers its devices. Meanwhile, Samsung is releasing a new line of non-Android phones, and Microsoft is moving in with their long-awaited "Mango" phones. Is this the beginning of the end of the Android empire?

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