Clearest Images Yet of How Astronauts Marked Up the Moon

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Two weeks ago, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, hovering only 13 to 15 miles above the moon's surface, snapped what NASA is calling the "sharpest images ever taken from space" of the paths left by Apollo astronauts when they walked on the moon from 1969 through 1972. Now NASA has released those photos, and they're worth a look (if you go to NASA's site you can compare the pictures with less crisp LRO images from 2009). This image shows the Apollo 17 landing site, including the dual tracks left by the lunar rover and the last foot trails made on the moon by humans:

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