Where Ideas Come From: Inside Thumbtack's Headquarters

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This is part of an occasional photo feature that takes you inside the headquarters of today's top tech companies, from the big multinationals to the young startups of Silicon Valley. If you'd like to participate, or have a company to suggest, email me at njackson[at]theatlantic[dot]com.

An online marketplace for local services, Thumbtack is a startup that seeks to connect customers to trustworthy professionals. Only two years after launching in 2009, the company has attracted more than 150,000 local businesses to its website and continues to expand rapidly. Growth was slow at first, but when the economy cratered, hundreds of businesses reached out to Thumbtack as a way to market their services on the cheap. After the site hit critical mass, largely thanks to a 100-plus-strong team in the Philippines that has been vetting and integrating new additions to the site, letters of interest poured in.

The 11-person U.S.-based team works out of a converted industrial building in downtown San Francisco. The structure, a foundry and photography studio in the past, has an open layout and a large kitchen that was first installed as a set for the photographer that owns the space. The building's exposed brick and timber frame give it a unique look and feel.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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