The Secret to Twitter's Hip Corporate Culture: Stationery

Elizabeth Bailey Weil lists her job title at Twitter as "Head of Culture," and we're not really sure what that means. Thankfully, a profile of sorts in Thursday's Wall Street Journal offers some clues. After joining the company in 2009 to help handle mergers and acquisitions, Weil floated the idea of creating the position to her boss and Twitter's CEO Dick Costolo, and he gave it the go-ahead. From The Journal's description Weil's job consists partly of creating "branded goods to bolster employee morale" and "to make a rapidly expanding company feel small." The lynchpin and presumable inspiration is an old-timey letterpress that Weil runs out of her garage:

"[Weil] pens welcome notes on her hand-made stationery to all new Twitter employees. By her account, she's done about 600."

"Paper has a particular appeal for those who spend hours at a time in front of a screen. Much of the recent small-stationery resurgence has taken place in letterpress printing, a method that uses raised type to make a deep impression in thick paper, creating a substantial, textured object. 'You can pet it,' says Ms. Weil."

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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