Facebook's Big Push to Put Advertising in Your News Feed

Facebook plans to change its news feed from a curated stream of information to unfiltered mayhem, reports The Wall Street Journal's Shayndi Raice and Emily Steele. Currently an algorithm decides what you see in your feed -- generally the feed shows the activity of your friends with whom you interact most. And while users might like that the system hides "Friends" who aren't friends, advertisers don't appreciate the veil -- they want those valuable eyeballs. Facebookers will likely resist the changes -- as they do when Facebook makes any design tweaks -- but this time Facebook admittedly doesn't care about the people. It's now an advertising-first company.

Advertisers have recognized the value of 750 million users, but Facebook has resisted splattering the site with tacky banner ads; as Justin Timberlake (as Sean Parker) noted in The Social Network, "You don't want to ruin [Facebook] with ads, because ads aren't cool." But now the social network's not worrying as much about being cool and would like to cash in. Advertisers can try to get their message in front of that huge user base with the "Like" button and on brand pages. But the feed's ability to hide certain (annoying) information has limited the reach that advertisers seek, explain Raice and Steele.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

Presented by

The Atlantic Wire is your authoritative guide to the news and ideas that matter most right now.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Video

The Faces of #BlackLivesMatter

Scenes from a recent protest in New York City

Video

Desegregated, Yet Unequal

A short documentary about the legacy of Boston busing

Video

Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life

The Supreme Court justice talks gender equality and marriage.

Video

Social Media: The Video Game

What if the validation of your peers could "level up" your life?

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

More in Technology

Just In