Adobe Quietly Surrenders to Steve Jobs, Builds Flash Alternative

More

Thanks to a new Flash alternative released Monday, Adobe software will finally be compatible with Apple's mobile devices. Adobe Edge is a new HTML5-powered design tool that the company says will complement its existing suite of web software, including the famously not iPhone-friendly Flash software. In its press release announcing the release, Adobe talks at length about the power of HTML5 and their continued contributions to building products that cater to the new web standard. But except for a tiny mention of compatibility with Apple's mobile operating system, they leave out the fact that they're doing exactly what Steve Jobs told them to do a little over a year ago.

HTML5 has been all the rage in the developer world for a while. Now seven years in the making, the web programming language was always meant to be a more powerful and more open web standard. Not many people outside of the coder community knew about HTML5 until April 2010 when Steve Jobs explained on Apple's website why his company's mobile devices didn't support Adobe's Flash animation software. Jobs links Flash to the "PC era," noting how the future mobile-centric world would be based on "low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards--all areas where Flash falls short." He continues with a pretty upfront recommendation to Adobe's executives: "New open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win on mobile devices (and PCs too). Perhaps Adobe should focus more on creating great HTML5 tools for the future, and less on criticizing Apple for leaving the past behind."

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

Jump to comments
Presented by

The Atlantic Wire is your authoritative guide to the news and ideas that matter most right now.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Where the Wildest Things Are

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Where the Wild Things Go

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Adults Need Playtime Too

When was the last time you played your favorite childhood game?

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Technology

Just In