Video of the Day: A Kickstarter Project for a Camera-Enabled Eye

San Francisco artist Tanya Vlach lost her eye in a car accident in 2005. Instead of continuing to use her standard glass eye or sealing the cavity with stitches, Vlach wants to build a prosthetic outfitted with a tiny, wireless camera. Seeking to raise $15,000, she has turned to Kickstarter. And, with 19 days still left to go in the project's funding cycle, Vlach's 170-plus supporters have already pledged nearly $7,000 towards her goal.

"I've been plotting new strategies to tell my story, both my personal one and the one of my sci-fi alter ego, into a transmedia platform, which will include: a graphic novel, an experimental documentary, a web series, a game, and a live performance," Vlach wrote on her project's Kickstarter page. "Grow a new eye -- is about engineering a new bionic camera eye."

It's still unclear what Vlach will do with her new eye, but the prosthetic would allow her to constantly record the tiny details that otherwise go forgotten, the ones that quickly fade from our short-term memories. "Would having a permanent record of the visual data from your life be handy, or just cumbersome?," the Huffington Post wonders. "Would it tempt you to spend more time reliving than actually living?"

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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