The Titanic Wreckage at 100: Never-Before-Seen Photos

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A team of scientists that took part in a 2010 expedition to its resting place revealed never-before-seen images of the Titanic in a Norfolk, Virginia, courtroom late last week. As part of a salvage case involving the wreck that is still heated more than 25 years after its discovery, the Norfolk judge had to don 3-D glasses to inspect the images, the highest-quality photographs ever captured of the ship. The images show Captain Smith's bathtub and other items from the 100-year-old cruise liner, one of the most stunning technological achievements of the early 20th century, and they're incredible.

Displayed below with some other photographs that capture the spirit of the RMS Titanic, the images shed new light -- literally and figuratively -- on the three-by-five-mile wreck site located more than two miles below the surface of the ocean. They were captured by a remote-controlled camera attached to a submersible vehicle.

"The new images will ultimately be assembled for public viewing, scientists said," according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "and to help oceanographers and archaeologists explain the ship's violent descent to the ocean bottom. It is also intended to provide answers on the state of the wreck, which scientists say is showing increasing signs of deterioration."

The submersibles captured every inch of what remains from the world's most famous shipwreck using the latest technologies. "Individual images are stitched together in a mosaic process to create large-scale, almost panoramic views of the wreck," the AJC explained.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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