Meet All of the Entrepreneurs Selected to Attend Techstars NYC

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Two brothers, Seth Godin's teenage son, and three dropouts from the University of Pennsylvania.

Those are just some of the founders who will be debuting this summer at Techstars NYC Demo Day.

Getting accepted into the three-month startup accelerator program is ridiculously difficult. Out of 1,068 applications, only 12 companies and 31 founders were selected.

That's an acceptance rate of 1.1 percent -- lower than any Ivy League school. It's the most competitive TechStars session yet (for comparison, there were 600 applicants last winter).

David Tisch, managing director of Techstars NYC, tells us how he made the hard decisions.

"One of the main characteristics in this group [of people] was a deep passion and/or understanding of the vertical they are working on," Tisch says. "Because of the quality of applicants, this time, companies that stood out were incredibly strong teams, working in a big market, with an interesting idea/product. It took all three to get in this time really."

We stalked all of the founders online, dug up their pasts, and found out why they were picked to represent the summer group.

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Alyson Shontell is an editor for Silicon Alley Insider, Business Insider's technology section. She also covers startups for the site.

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