Is Microsoft Working on a New Social Search Project?

First Google, now Microsoft? Just a day after Google announced the success of its new social site Google+, which has reached 10 million users, Microsoft leaked what looks like a new social search project, which they've dubbed Tulalip -- The name could use work. The details were found on another site, Socl.com and were quickly replaced with the following message: "Thanks for stopping by. Socl.com is an internal design project from a team in Microsoft Research which was mistakenly published to the web. We didn't mean to, honest," reports Mashable.

While Microsoft gives a vague notion of the site, calling it an "internal design project," Gizmodo's Kat Hannaford questions this: "Internal design project, or new social-networking site?" It looks like it has social components, given the  tagline (see the screengrab above), but it's unlikely a competitor to Facebook and Google+, as Hannaford admits. "Given the one image that was on Socl.com shows log-ins for both Facebook and Twitter, I'm hazarding a guess that it's not designed to take on either service."

Some techies have some guesses on what new Internet social tool you might be forced to join in the near future.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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