Infographic: The Most Expensive Keywords in Google AdWords

Those little text ads you see next to most of your search results? They make up a large chunk of advertising on Google, which is responsible for 97 percent of the search giant's revenue over the past year. The company is making about $3 billion every month from advertising. And that number continues to climb as more and more people realize that they want to own certain terms.

This new infographic from WordStream looks at the top 20 categories -- combined, they account for about 70 percent of Google's ad revenues -- where companies continue to bid against each other for ownership. To advertise against "insurance," for example, now costs more than $54 for a single visitor. That's what an advertiser pays Google each time that someone clicks on one of their ads.

Infographics are always a bit of a hodgepodge of statistics culled from a variety of sources. Here, we sort through the clutter and pull out some of our favorite facts and figures:

  • Of Google's revenue, 97 percent, or $33.3 billion from the third quarter of 2010 through the second quarter of 2011, is from advertising.
  • The number one keyword on Google AdWords is "insurance," which brings in up for $54.91 per click. Top sample queries: "auto insurance price quotes," "ca automobile insurance," "building contents insurance," "buy car insurance online," "life insurance comparison quotes."
  • The number two keyword on Google AdWords is "loans," which brings in up for $44.28 per click. Top sample queries: "consolodate [sic] graduate student loans," "fixed home equity loan rates," "cheapest homeowner loans," "fixed rate secured loans."
  • The number three keyword on Google AdWords is "mortgage," which brings in up for $47.12 per click.
  • The number four keyword on Google AdWords is "attorney," which brings in up for $47.07 per click.

Check out more Infographics on the Technology Channel.

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Presented by

Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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