Facebook's Privacy Approach Satisfies at Least One Person

Over the past couple of months, Facebook has drawn global criticism for a facial recognition feature in its photo application. The feature uses facial recognition to offer suggestions for users when they're tagging photos. Though the feature launched quietly in the U.S. over the winter, a collective outburst of protests from government officials in Europe led the Attorney General of Connecticut to send a scolding letter. George Jepsen complained that Facebook should have made the feature opt-in instead of opt-out, and Facebook promised to address his concerns.

Tuesday afternoon, Jepsen said in a statement that Facebook had satisfactorily addressed the problems and even added a few more features. Evidently a representative from Facebook met with the attorney, and the two of them worked out a solution that curiously didn't actually address Jepsen's original opt-in request.

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