Google might be trying to steal some of Zuckerberg's users with its new social service, but the Facebook crowd is making itself heard

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On July 4, just six days after the launch of Google+, the much-anticipated social sharing service from Google has an unlikely star. Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and CEO of Facebook, often tossed around in headlines and stories about Google+ as the service's primary target -- for destruction, not adoption -- has more followers than anybody else. By far.

According to Social Statistics, a tracking service for Google+ users that is in beta mode, Zuckerberg has more than 21,000 followers even though he hasn't actually used the service. He just has an empty profile with a way-too-close-up photo of his face staring into your eyes and nothing more. (Note: Social Statistics appears to updating slowly. When I visited Zuckerberg's profile while writing this, he had nearly 30,000 followers -- see the embedded profile page displayed above. The assumption, though, is that his number of followers has grown at a rate proportional to that for other users.)

The second most popular Google+ user is Larry Page, with just under 15,000 followers. That makes more sense: A co-founder of Google, Page was named the company's chief executive officer this last January. The rest of the Google+ top 10 is filled out primarily by tech bloggers, such as Gina Trapani, the founder of Gawker's Lifehacker blog; Robert Scoble; and MG Siegler of TechCrunch.

Image: Google+.