Dolphins Have Another Secret Power: Electrolocation

dolphinhat.jpg

A species of dolphin can sense electrical fields with special sensory organs in its snout, marine biologists writing in the journal Royal Society Proceedings B, confirmed today. While we've known sharks, rays, and other fish had similar capabilities, among mammals, only the platypus had been shown to sense electrical fields. The discovery was made in the Guiana dolphin, which is native to South America.

What can't dolphins do? They heal jaw-droppingly quickly. They can swim up to 22 miles per hour, dive past 2,000 feet, and hold their breath for 12 minutes. Not to mention echolocation or their still-unknown linguistic facility or their brand strength among the valuable tween girl demographic!

Why hasn't there been a superhero comic book or cartoon based on a pod of dolphins?

Via Philip Bump.

Presented by

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Technology

Just In