Why French Broadcasters Can't Say 'Twitter' and 'Facebook' Anymore

According to a ruling out this week, French radio and television broadcasters must stop singling out the social networks on the air unless they're covering a story about that specific network. Citing a 1992 law that prohibits surreptitious advertising, the ruling is intended to keep networks from providing an unfair advantage to the already very popular services. Christine Kelly, the spokesperson for the French broadcast regulation body Conseil Supérieur de l'Audiovisuel said in a statement:

Why give preference to Facebook, which is worth billions of dollars, when there are many other social networks that are struggling for recognition. This would be a distortion of competition. If we allow Facebook and Twitter to be cited on air, it's opening a Pandora's Box -- other social networks will complain to us saying, "Why not us?"

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