What Twitter Users Are Doing With LulzSec's 62,000 Leaked Logins

LulzSec's latest move was to release a file with about 62,000 seemingly random email address and passwords. These are logins for a number of websites, but the hacker collective, which has been in and out of the news recently because of its publicity stunts, isn't saying which ones. It wants its fans and Twitter followers to find out for themselves. The Atlantic Wire's Adam Martin has collected a bunch of the finds, from hacked Facebook accounts to active dating site profiles:

It's been a hell of a week for hacking. While the attacks on Citigroup and the International Monetary Fund were high-profile and perhaps more significant than the mischevious rampage of the shadowy Lulz Security, LulzSec is the outfit garnering fascination online because of its thumb-to-nose publicity stunts. On Tuesday, the group opened a telephone hotline to take requests for hacking targets, and attacked gaming sites, security firms, and a magazine. Yesterday, apparently in response to Twitter taunts from rival hacker Quadrapodacone, LulzSec took down the Web site for the Central Intelligence Agency.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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