Video of the Day: Macouno's Fossils From the Future

Macouno needs your help. The painter-turned-computer artist is currently working on Entoforms, a series of creatures made using 3-D printers that he describes as "fossils from the future," and he wants you to add to the growing collection. Because he uses Python, the free programming language, and other Creative Commons-licensed programs, everything about the Entoforms is open-source. Slowly, Macouno and his followers are building these creatures on computers and printing out a race of digi-bugs.

Macouno has been working on Entoforms since January of this year and already there is an exhibit of his work planned for the summer. They will also be shown at Amsterdam's Affordable Art Fair in the fall of 2011, according to his website. Displayed using the actual techniques that biologists and other scientists use to preserve their specimens, the Entoforms are "creatures based on DNA," according to their creator. "Their DNA is text. I can grow them based on your name, for instance," he explains in the introductory video embedded below.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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