Library of Congress Receives Rare Map Depicting Earth as Flat

More

Former North Dakota state senator Don Homuth received a special gift from his English teacher when he was in eighth grade. Concerned that he was the only person with a copy of this map, which depicts the Earth as flat, Homuth protected it. When he learned that the Pioneer Historical Museum in Hot Springs, South Dakota, had a second copy of the map, named "Square and Stationary Earth," Homuth decided to donate his copy to the Library of Congress.

The interesting thing about the map is that it was created about 120 years ago by Orlando Ferguson, then a practicing physician in Hot Springs. This is more than 500 years after most educated people gave up on the idea of the Earth as flat and accepted the spherical viewpoint first expressed by the Ancient Greeks. "Homuth referred to Ferguson as a 'self-appointed expert on the Bible who always contended that the Earth was flat and square," USA Today reported. "Ferguson published his beliefs in a book, titled The Square and Stationary Earth, and devised a map that he argued was 'the Bible map of Earth.'"

After receiving an email from Homuth describing the map, specialists at the Library of Congress decided it would make a unique addition to their collection. There are very few maps in existence that support the theory that the Earth is flat.

FlatEarthMap-Post.jpg

Jump to comments
Presented by

Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

What makes a story great? The storytellers behind House of CardsThis American LifeThe Moth, and more reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Technology

Just In