Japan More Than Doubles Fukushima Radiation Estimate

Japanese officials have admitted that they were unprepared for the events that led to the Fukushima nuclear disaster earlier this year. Now we learn that the consequences of that unpreparedness are worse than initially anticipated.

Japan's nuclear officials have doubled their estimate of the radiation that escaped from the Fukushima nuclear plant in the first week after the country's March 11 earthquake and tsunami, raising the level from 370,000 terabecquerels to 770,000 terabecquerels. The BBC explains that while the amount is only 15 percent of the total released during the world's worst nuclear disaster -- Chernobyl in 1986 -- the revision indicates that the contamination near the plant is worse than originally thought and will likely lead to more criticism of the plant's operator and the government for not releasing information quickly enough during the crisis. The officials also revealed that meltdowns occurred in three reactors more quickly than previously thought.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

Presented by

The Atlantic Wire is your authoritative guide to the news and ideas that matter most right now.

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. Who cares about youth? James Hamblin turns to his colleague Jeffrey Goldberg for advice.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Never Tell People How Old They Look

Age discrimination affects us all. James Hamblin turns to a colleague for advice.

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

Video

Pittsburgh: 'Better Than You Thought'

How Steel City became a bikeable, walkable paradise

Video

A Four-Dimensional Tour of Boston

In this groundbreaking video, time moves at multiple speeds within a single frame.

Video

Who Made Pop Music So Repetitive? You Did.

If pop music is too homogenous, that's because listeners want it that way.

More in Technology

Just In