Japan More Than Doubles Fukushima Radiation Estimate

Japanese officials have admitted that they were unprepared for the events that led to the Fukushima nuclear disaster earlier this year. Now we learn that the consequences of that unpreparedness are worse than initially anticipated.

Japan's nuclear officials have doubled their estimate of the radiation that escaped from the Fukushima nuclear plant in the first week after the country's March 11 earthquake and tsunami, raising the level from 370,000 terabecquerels to 770,000 terabecquerels. The BBC explains that while the amount is only 15 percent of the total released during the world's worst nuclear disaster -- Chernobyl in 1986 -- the revision indicates that the contamination near the plant is worse than originally thought and will likely lead to more criticism of the plant's operator and the government for not releasing information quickly enough during the crisis. The officials also revealed that meltdowns occurred in three reactors more quickly than previously thought.

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