Infographic: A Map of America as Created by Twitter Geotags

On Twitter, my location is listed as Washington, D.C. But I'm a boring person who likes to give it to you straight. Because the location field on the popular short-form messaging service allows users to input any string of text that they'd like, an interesting database of non-geo geotags has been created. The only prompt: "Where in the world are you?"

For InboxQ, Column Five Media created this fun infographic using some of the most popular geotags. "Sixty-six percent of Twitter users don't give an actual city as their 'location,' according to the infographic's introduction. "So where is everyone? We sifted through geotagged tweets from users in places like Justin Bieber's Heart and Where Da Blunts At to find out what our great country would look like if it were left up to the Twitterverse."

As you can see, a number of New York-based tweets come not from Manhattan, but from Gotham. Some other popular Twitter versions of our nation's biggest cities: Nawlins instead of New Orleans, Milwacky in place of Milwaukee, ATX stands in for Austin and El Lay for Los Angeles. You can see some of the others embedded below. (Click on the infographic to enlarge it.)

Check out more Infographics on the Technology Channel.

america-according-to-twitter.png

Presented by

Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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