My Favorite Photo Ever: A Military Dog Jumping Out of a Helicopter

110504_wardogs1.jpg

Thank you, Rebecca Frankel of Foreign Policy, for creating a wonderful gallery about the dogs of war, pegged to the fact that a dog was among the contingent of commandos sent to kill Osama Bin Laden. The two lead photographs show dogs jumping out of aircraft, which I find totally mindblowing. Here's Frankel's excellent explanation:

The question of how the dog got into bin Laden's compound is no puzzle -- the same way the special ops team did, by being lowered from an MH-60s helicopter. In fact, U.S. Air Force dogs have been airborne for decades, though the earliest flying dogs accompanied Soviet forces in the 1930s.

Dogs usually jump in tandem with their trainers, but when properly outfitted with flotation vests they can make short jumps into water on their own. A U.S. Navy SEAL, Mike Forsythe, and his dog, Cara -- pictured [below] -- recently broke the world record for "highest man/dog parachute deployment" by jumping from 30,100 feet.

Forget capitalist running dogs. I prefer communist flying dogs!

110504_110504_wardogs2BB.jpg

Images: 1. Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez, U.S. Air Force/ DoD; 2. U.S. Navy.

Via my colleague, Garance Franke-Ruta.

Presented by

How to Build a Tornado

A Canadian inventor believes his tornado machine could solve the world's energy crisis. The only problem? He has to prove it works.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

How to Build a Tornado

A Canadian inventor believes his tornado machine could solve the world's energy crisis.

Video

A New York City Minute, Frozen in Time

This short film takes you on a whirling tour of the Big Apple

Video

What Happened to the Milky Way?

Light pollution has taken away our ability to see the stars. Can we save the night sky?

Video

The Pentagon's $1.5 Trillion Mistake

The F-35 fighter jet was supposed to do everything. Instead, it can barely do anything.

More in Technology

Just In