Is Facebook Acting Like a Sovereign Nation?

With over 600 million active users, Facebook would be the third largest nation on the planet should the social network ever seek a place on the world stage. But while a keynote address at the United Nations might not be in Mark Zuckerberg's future, Facebook is starting to more actively engage with governmental institutions and media outlets around the world. At The Atlantic Wire, Adam Clark Estes ponders the social network's new geopolitical complexion.


Over the past few months, the Palo Alto company has been hiring out a global policy team to act as ambassadors for Facebook's interests abroad. "This is the right investment for us to make because we want to have better relationships with regulators and policymakers across Europe and around the world," Debbie Frost told Silicon Valley's Mercury News. "It's important that we have a presence, so people can have a direct line into Facebook." That presence will span the globe, but the recruiting of directors is assertively focused on Europe and the Middle East. The company wants privacy experts with sterling credentials. "Facebook wants a person comfortable with politicians at the most senior levels of government, who has experience as a media spokesperson, preferably on both radio and TV; and of course, has 'a passionate belief' in Facebook," reports the Mercury News, who are calling the new global team members "diplomats." The strategy makes sense--over 70 percent of Facebook's 600 million users live outside the United States.

Part spokesperson, part diplomat, the new role for Facebook highlights how the company is deeply interested in building a rapport with the world's most influential governments.

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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