Infographic: The Royal Wedding Social Media Snapshot

Interest in the royal wedding on Friday morning was so great that it brought down the BBC's website, where millions of visitors hoped to receive up-to-the-minute details as Kate Middleton married Prince William. We put together a quick story last week that highlighted some of the amazing records that those interested onlookers broke: millions of tweets, searches and Facebook comments; thousands of related YouTube videos; and more. But that data aged quickly. Now, three days later, things have calmed down a bit and, with the waters clear, Webtrends has looked back at the numbers.

Between noon the previous day and noon on the big day PST, Webtrends, a web analytics company, tracked social media mentions of the wedding and used the data to compile the infographic displayed below.

Infographics are always a bit of a hodgepodge of statistics culled from a variety of sources. Here, we sort through the clutter and pull out some of our favorite facts and figures:

  • There were 2.7 million mentions of the royal wedding on social media outlets over the 24-hour period, with a vast majority (94.7 percent) happening on Twitter.
  • The Queen was mentioned more often than Pippa Middleton, the bride's younger sister; Prince Harry, the groom's younger brother; and other attendees.
  • More than 55 percent of the social media mentions originated in the United States, compared to less than 17 percent in the United Kingdom. Another 3.2 percent originated in Australia and 1.6 percent in Indonesia.

Check out more Infographics on the Technology Channel.

royal-wedding-infographic3.jpg

Presented by

Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Photos of New York City, in Motion

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Technology

Just In