Google Celebrates First World's Fair With Animated Doodle

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One hundred and sixty years after the first World's Fair was held in London's Crystal Palace, Google celebrates the event with a new Doodle that greeted visitors to the search engine's site today. Google Doodles have become more and more common since they first premiered several years ago, with the company now creating several new ones every week to commemorate holidays, anniversaries and other events on many of its international pages. But this Doodle could be one of the most elaborate yet.

When visitors direct their browsers to Google.com, they're greeted with a magnifying glass that can be used to explore the design in more detail. A few seconds and a wave of the mouse reveals an intricate and even animated world built into the few pixels that Google's art team had to play with. Hover over the fountain in the middle to watch it come alive or place the magnifier over a woman dressed in period costume on the right-hand side of the image to see her twirl.

Below, a short video exploring the Doodle should it be replaced before you get a chance to check it out for yourself.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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