Facebook Says They Weren't Trying to 'Smear' Anyone

The Atlantic Wire's Adam Clark Estes notes that the blame game between Facebook and Google is just getting started over a story that broke Thursday alleging Facebook executives hired Burson-Marsteller to spread rumors about Google's privacy policies. Speaking to the Huffington Post, Facebook denied that a smear campaign was authorized.

Hiring a PR firm to help write and disseminate negative blog posts about Google certainly sounds like a smear campaign. Burson fessed up to the wrong-doing this morning and pushed blame onto Facebook for requiring them to hide the name of their client. Without casting too much judgment on anyone--PR companies are great at that--Burson said, "Whatever the rationale, this was not at all standard operating procedure and is against our policies, and the assignment on those terms should have been declined."

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

Presented by

The Atlantic Wire is your authoritative guide to the news and ideas that matter most right now.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Technology

Just In