Facebook Not Looking Great on Second Day of Googlegate

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The Atlantic Wire's Adam Clark Estes continues to cover the story of Facebook's hiring of Burson-Marsteller to smear Google in the press as it evolves. Now, he brings us a round-up of what the tech press is saying.

Facebook looks down right desperate and hypocritical. The young company struggling to stay small and seem cool as investors wonder if Facebook could be a trillion dollar company comes of a little childish if not pathetic in the face of their biggest competitor. Yesterday, we quoted the Next Web's Paul Sawar who wrote that a company as successful as Facebook doesn't need to do such silly things as sling mud: "It's normally desperate companies on the decline that get involved in these sort of shenanigans." Gawker's Ryan Tate reminds us that Facebook is in fact desperate to erase their own "well earned reputation for being two faced, greedy and untrustworthy" and adding a fresh dose of hypocrisy is counterproductive....

Read the full story at The Atlantic Wire.

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