Video of the Day: Time-Lapse Photographs of the Milky Way

Terje Sorgjerd is master of drawing the unbelievable out of the natural world. The Norwegian photographer and videographer, whose work has been published in National Geographic, Reuters, the Washington Post and elsewhere, is probably best known for his mind-blowing photographs of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano that erupted in Iceland in 2010, disrupting air travel between North America and Europe for nearly a week. Terje Sorgjerd has a talent for videography and time-lapse photography as well; his video "The Aurora," recorded over the span of a week in the Kirkenes and Pas National Park bordering Russia, captured the ripple of the Aurora Borealis.

On April 4, Sorgjerd set out to capture the Milky Way with the same vividness as the Aurora. Shooting from El Teide, Spain´s highest peak, the result was "The Mountain:"

"El Teide is one of the best places in the world to photograph the stars and is also the location of Teide Observatories, considered to be one of the world´s best observatories," Sorgjerd wrote on his Vimeo page: 

The goal was to capture the beautiful Milky Way galaxy along with one of the most amazing mountains I know, El Teide. I have to say this was one of the most exhausting trips I have done. There was a lot of hiking at high altitudes and probably less than 10 hours of sleep in total for the whole week. Having been here 10-11 times before I had a long list of must-see locations I wanted to capture for this movie, but I am still not 100% used to carrying around so much gear required for time-lapse movies.

While Sorgjerd's photographs are nothing short of astounding, the music -- "Nuvole bianche" composed by Sorgjerd's friend Ludovico Einaudi -- truly makes the video. Read more about Sorgjerd's technique at Vimeo.

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Jared Keller is a former associate editor for The Atlantic and The Atlantic Wire and has also written for Lapham's Quarterly's Deja Vu blog, National Journal's The Hotline, Boston's Weekly Dig, and Preservation magazine. 

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